Portrait of President Loope
President Loope is the sixth president of Beaufort County Community College

Installation Ceremony for President Loope March 23

Beaufort County Community College will hold the installation ceremony for its sixth president, Dr. David Loope, at 10:30 a.m., Friday, March 23, in the multi-purpose room of Building 10 on the BCCC campus.

A reception for Loope, hosted by the BCCC Board of Trustees, will follow the ceremony.

Most recently, Loope served as vice president of academic affairs/chief academic officer and professor at Reynolds Community College in Richmond, Va. During his seven years at Reynolds CC, Loope oversaw all academic programs across four schools and three campuses. He developed the college’s first Center for Faculty Engagement and restructured the Center for Distance Learning. He established Reynold’s first Developmental Education Advisory Committee and integrated developmental reading instruction into college-level curriculum.

He served as interim vice President of the Community College Workforce Alliance, where he worked with local business and industry partners on non-credit and credit workforce training.

During his 26 years in education, has worked with Tidewater Community College in Norfolk, Va., Old Dominion University and the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education. He holds a Doctor of Education in Higher Education from The College of William and Mary, a Master of Arts in English from Wake Forest University and a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville.

In 2017, the college celebrated its 50th anniversary, having started out as classrooms above the fire station in Washington in 1967. Today, BCCC serves a four-county area that includes Beaufort, Hyde, Tyrrell and Washington counties - geographically the largest service areas of any community college in the state.

The college employs some 400 full- and part-time faculty and staff and serves 2,000 curriculum students and 4,500 students through its Division of Continuing Education. Of these students, 650 are high school students dual-enrolled through early college high schools and other programs throughout the four-county service area. Degree programs include nursing, medical office administration, business administration, electrical engineering technology and an array of university transfer programs.

The college also provides personal enrichment classes, high school equivalency and emergency services training and workforce training programs. BCCC operates two satellite facilities in Roper and Engelhard, in addition to its 14-building main campus outside of Washington.